Hidden Scotland

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People travelling to the UK, and Scotland in particular, this summer may have heard about a little thing called the Commonwealth Games which will be heading to Glasgow. This is bound to draw in the crowds and visitors from across the globe, as will the world famous Edinburgh Festival.

For anyone visiting the country for these events or any others you will find countless guides for things to do and entertain you, here is a list of some events and things to do that you might not see on the regular lists.
In September the World Stone Skimming Championships take place on the picturesque Easdale Island. This wonderful, family event has many different categories ensuring everyone can participate in the fun and who wouldn’t want the opportunity to become a world champion? Just be warned, the locals are pretty good and there are some real experts.

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Another interesting tournament that you might want to take part in is Ardbeg Swamp Soccer World Cup. If you don’t mind getting a bit mucky this tournament could be a great opportunity to you to play in the World Cup final. It might be a bit different to the World Cup in Brazil but it sure to be a fun weekend at the end of June.

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While you may be more familiar with the Whisky tours available in Scotland, the Drygate Brewing Co. are trying to change that offering an interactive experience for beer enthusiasts to take advantage of.
Following the success of the popular TV show, Vikings, visitors to Scotland might want to visit the popular seaside town of Largs and take in the Viking festival. You can learn more about the Viking way of life and the history surrounding the attempted invasion of 1263.

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Harry Potter fans also have the opportunity to see some of the locations used in the filming such as the Glenfinnan Viaduct and Alnwick Castle. Edinburgh also holds several locations of interest for fans of the books with cafes frequented by J K Rowling during the writing of the saga being available to visit.

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Of course, this is just a tiny glimpse of what Scotland has to offer so if you are looking for a family break, adventure, cultural or even just a relaxing break away then Scotland could have what you are looking for. Another great benefit is that the relatively small country allows for easy travel meaning you can fit in more than you might expect. Looking at sites like Logan Car Hire, see here for more details, can let you know what options you have available to you in regards to having your own transport or you can look at the public transport choices that you will have.

Medical Travel to Save Money

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The emergence of low cost airlines over the last 10 years has really opened up a huge number of opportunities to save money. This not only applies to picking up more affordable holidays – people have used these budget flights to find incredible deals on everything from cars to furniture. But in recent years there’s been a new kind of money saving tourism which is becoming more popular – medical tourism.

Primarily based on cosmetic procedures such as cosmetic dentistry or cosmetic surgery, people are finding that they can save a small fortune by travelling overseas for bigger procedures. The cost of treatment can vary wildly from country to country, and even from city to city in the UK. For example, the cost of teeth whitening in Glasgow is a far different price to what you’d pay for the same treatment in Essex. Travelling just a few hundred miles can often mean hundreds of pound in savings.

Several central European countries are gradually becoming extremely popular for cosmetic dentistry and cosmetic surgery, with people flying from all over the world to have various treatments. Hungary, Poland, Latvia and the Czech Republic are all proving popular with Europeans and North Americans, to the point where many local practices in the UK and USA are referring patients to European clinics that they have endorsed or funded themselves.

If the standard of care being provided in these clinics and hospitals is up to scratch, which for the most part appears to be the case, then it’s hard to argue with people looking to save huge amounts of money. With many procedures running in to thousands of pounds, even a saving of 30% can make it feasible to travel and stay abroad rather than have the treatment at home.

Personally, I’m all for medical tourism as long as proper research is carried out by the patient before committing to a procedure. What do you think? Is medical tourism a good idea?